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One of Google’s greatest achievements is to make itself indispensable to its users. As the graph from Statcounter below shows Google is utterly dominant in world search engine use. If you look at the chart for mobile search engine use it’s even more ubiquitous.

Such is this dominance that other search engines, however good, will face the immediate problem of legitimacy. If you actually compare Google, Bing and Yahoo results there isn’t an enormous amount of difference but most users will probably be inclined, even if using another search engine, to check Google as well to be safe.

As a librarian I see it as my duty to try out other search engines and as a result I’ve managed to ween myself off sticking everything in Google. My current search engine of choice is DuckDuckGo but I’ve also tried many of the search engines from this list to see how my results change.

Google is a very powerful search engine which gains relevance every time it is used however it is worth remembering that that which is popular isn’t necessarily that which is best.

Global search engine use in 2011

Image representing Duck Duck Go as depicted in...

Image via CrunchBase

Fed up of Google constantly adding things, trying to sell you things based on your private data or being evil in general?

Don’t want to try Bing because let’s be honest Microsoft aren’t exactly angels themselves.

Don’t want to try Yahoo because it’s Bing with a different dress on…

Try DuckDuckGo then! It’s very simple (a bit like Google was 10 years ago), produces relevant search results, has little to no advertising, doesn’t collect private data, provides instant answers and is easy to plug-in to Firefox.

10 Search Engines to Explore the Invisible Web.

Saikat Basu’s article above showcases a number of search engines to penetrate the murky world of the deep or invisible web. In it Saikat Basu notes that:

“ the size of the open web is 167 terabytes. The Invisible Web is estimated at 91,000 terabytes. Check this out – the Library of Congress, in 1997, was figured to have close to 3,000 terabytes!”

This means that the open web makes up just 0.18% of the web. This also means that search engines like Google and Bing only index a minuscule fraction of the web given that neither indexes the deep web.

So folks when a librarian tells you not everything’s on Google they really do mean it!

English: Google China

Image via Wikipedia

In his rather good book about the mighty Google Ken Auleta said that one of Google’s strengths was that it was a platform to the rest of the web and that it wanted users to spend as little time on the Google search page as possible. He was comparing it to portal sites like Yahoo! and AOL which rapidly fell out of favour at the turn of the century while Google grew from strength to strength. When Google first appeared in 1998 the difference between it and other search engine sites was stark. The minimal feel of Google was liberating and allowed users to be in control of the information they viewed rather than suggesting it like Yahoo! or the like.

Step forward nearly 15 years (I know it’s been that long) and things have changed. Although Google is still unequivocally the king of search in most developed countries (with China and Russia notable exceptions) it has had to change its strategy to deal with a new kind of enemy – the social network, and particularly Facebook. Recent research has shown American’s spend five times as much web time on Facebook than any Google site. This is why when you compare Google today to how it was even a few years back it has become far more concerned with how long you spend on its site. Nowadays through search personalisation, Google+, Gmail, Blogger and so on Google wants to keep you right where they can see you.

What does this mean for the future? Well with Google+ going live this week there’s no going back, Google is now slowly becoming a portal and in doing so is a long long way from its roots.

Ever seen Minority Report? You know it has that mad little fella who used to be a bit of a sex symbol and is now a scientarianist or something. It’s an okay film but not as good as the book and it has a little something to do with the subject of this post which isa rather funky visual search engine called Search-cube.

Powered by Google Search-Cube takes your search query and presents your search engine result pages as thumbnails grouped together in a three dimensional cube. And it isn’t just full pages. As the image below shows it groups together images, videos and pages.

Search-cube results page

It is essentially a visual re-imagining of cluster search engines like Carrot2 and the now defunct wonder wheel which was an option for displaying search results in Google. Unlike those and other clustering search engines though this has the added visual factor enabling you to preview your results holistically before you click through. This negates the need for scrolling with the user only having to move the cube around. The preview thumbnails are a bit rough round the edges at the moment but this is likely to improve.

And so back to the start of this post and Minority Report where the characters used gloves to navigate the internet through literally grabbing images and pages and looking at them. Search-cube feels like a small step in that direction…oh yes and it’s powered by Google (nothing slips past them does it!).

Over and out.

Finger and pulsating circles

(c) AngelIT 2008

What with the fall of society being blamed on technology by certain corners of society (certain, not very sharp corners if you’ll forgive the pun) it seems only a matter of time before we’re all reduced to a pre-internet state using pens and papers and…oh god it’s too much to imagine. What did people do before the internet?!

Anyway ramblings aside as you can tell from my tone I’m a tad dismissive about the idea that technology was to blame for the horrifying scenes last week across England. Riots aren’t new Twitter is is my concise rebutal to that argument. What the likes of Twitter and other realtime sites does facilitate is the most up-to-date reporting of events across the world that we’ve ever been able to manage as hairless apes.

A relatively new player in the search engine game has appeared as a result: real time search engines. With the phenomenal surge of information being created by the likes of social networks traditional search engines cannot keep up with the pace lagged as they are by their indexed lists of webpages.

My favourite real-time search engine is Twazzup which I discovered from Phil Bradley’s excellent blog a few weeks ago. During the riots I found this a more useful source of information than mainstream search engines or even news sites as it groups together Tweets, news stories, so-called influencers (sites which are generating a lot of content on your search subject) and top links.

Twazzup is just one of many real time search engines to have emerged over the past year and it’s something to keep an eye on with Larry Page admitting it’s a gap in the market which Google hasn’t yet thrown piles of cash at according to this article from  Venturebeat (which also lists a few others you might want to try).

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